Britannia Hotels is the worst chain in UK, satisfaction survey finds #horse

#brittania hotels

#

Britannia Hotels is the worst chain in UK , satisfaction survey finds

John Cleese as Basil Fawlty, whose hotel is a byword for poor service BBC

With “rundown” hotels that are “well past their best-by-dates”, Britannia Hotels’ accommodation is said to be more Fawlty Towers than first class.

Now, the hotel group, used by the Home Office to house asylum seekers, has been rated the worst hotel chain in the UK for the second year in a row by the consumers’ association magazine Which?

Ranked last out of 29 chains, Britannia Hotels was awarded just one star – the lowest possible rating – for categories including bedrooms, cleanliness and whether the description of the hotel matched reality.

The Which UK hotel satisfaction survey, based on 5,888 member-experiences, ranked each chain according to an overall customer score based on categories such as customer service, food and value for money. Britannia Hotels, which fared poorly in all categories, achieved 33 per cent for its overall score – 3 per cent lower than in 2013, when it was also bottom of the poll.

The Britannia group, owned by businessman Alex Langsam, has previously acknowledged its problems and plans to “improve the standard” of its hotels, which include the Adelphi Hotel in Liverpool, Bosworth Hall Hotel in Warwickshire, The Grand in Scarborough, the Royal Albion Hotel in Brighton and the Russ Hill Hotel in Surrey.

The Roundhouse Hotel and Heathlands Hotel in Bournemouth and The Grand Burstin Hotel in Kent have been used by the Home Office to temporarily house more than 280 asylum seekers this year due to “overcrowding” at London’s detention centres. The group was unavailable for comment yesterday.

Premier Inn and Travelodge are the most used chains according to the survey, together accounting for more than half of all hotel stays. Premier Inn, visited by 668 members, gained four stars across the board, and an 81 per cent customer satisfaction score. The UK’s largest hotel brand came second only to Sofitel, which was awarded five stars in nearly every category and an 83 per cent customer rating.

Travelodge achieved a 60 per cent overall customer score, improving by 10 per cent since last year. The chain was placed in the bottom three in both 2012 and 2013, but has since invested £57m.

We’ve noticed that you are using an ad blocker.

Advertising helps fund our journalism and keep it truly independent. It helps to build our international editorial team, from war correspondents to investigative reporters, commentators to critics.

Click here to view instructions on how to disable your ad blocker, and help us to keep providing you with free-thinking journalism – for free.

Thank you for your support.

How to disable your ad blocker for independent.co.uk

Adblock / Adblock Plus

  • Click the Adblock/Adblock Plus icon, which is to the right of your address bar.
  • On Adblock click “Don’t run on pages on this domain”.
  • On Adblock Plus click “Enabled on this site” to disable ad blocking for the current website you are on. If you are in Firefox click “disable on independent.co.uk “.

Firefox Tracking Protection

  • If you are Private Browsing in Firefox, “Tracking Protection” may cause the adblock notice to show. It can be temporarily disabled by clicking the “shield” icon in the address bar.

Ghostery

  • Click the Ghostery icon.
  • In versions before 6.0 click “whitelist site”.
  • In version 6.0 click “trust site” or add independent.co.uk to your Trusted Site list.
  • In versions before 6.0 you will see the message “Site is whitelisted”.
  • Click “reload the page to see your changes”.

uBlock

  • Click the uBlock icon.
  • Then click the big power button to whitelist the current web site, and its state will be remembered next time you visit the web site.
  • Then reload the page.




Britain – s best and worst hotel chains named in Which? poll

#cheap hotel chains

#

Destinations

Britain’s best and worst hotel chains named in Which? poll

The survey of Which? readers, published today, saw hotel firms judged in nine categories, including cleanliness, customer service, food, and value for money.

Sofitel, the luxury arm of Novotel and the costliest chain to feature in the poll – with rooms prices at £144 a night, on average – took top honours. It scored five stars in seven categories for a total score of 83 per cent.

Other firms in the top five were Premier Inn with 82 per cent, Warner Leisure Hotels with 80 per cent, Hampton by Hilton with 78 per cent and Q Hotels, also with 78 per cent.

Premier Inn recently announced plans to roll-out a series of high-tech “hub” hotels . with the first due to open in Covent Garden next month.

Britannia Hotels propped up the table for the second year running, scoring just one star in five categories – bedrooms, bathrooms, cleanliness, communal areas and “description matching reality”.

Other poorly performing chains were Old English Inns/Hotels with 50 per cent, Principal Hayley Hotel with 55 per cent, and De Vere Hotels with 58 per cent.

Travelodge, one of Britain’s biggest hotel chains, also suffered, scoring 60 per cent, despite recently implementing a £57m overhaul of its rooms.

The cheapest hotel chain – Ibis, where rooms cost £32, on average – came 13th, out of 29.





Affordable Self Storage in Hampton, VA #affordable #self #storage, #reviews, #ratings, #recommendations,


#

Affordable Self Storage

Information about this business (4 )

6 locations to serve you6 va locations to serve youavailable-boxes andceilings-truckscobbs creek shacklefordcontrolled unites-highgloucester matthews hampton poquoson safe-clean-climatethe friendlier morethe friendlier more affordable alternative 223910attr:climate controlledstorage household & commercial

Posted on May 08, 2015. Brought to you by localcom.

Affordable Storage Inc is located at the address 1635 W Pembroke Ave Ste A in Hampton, Virginia 23661. They can be contacted via phone at (757) 723-6551 for pricing, hours and directions.

Affordable Storage Inc has an annual sales volume of 0 – 500K. For more information contact Dan Bolkhel, Owner or go to www.affordablestorageva.com

Affordable Storage Inc provides Dry Storage Units, Self.

Posted on September 02, 2014. Brought to you by chamberofcommerce.

We offer self storage to keep your personal items safe while you are moving, haveing work done to the house, TDY, or just need a place to put your access items till you can make room for them. We are open 7 days a week and will stay later if needed to assist with your move in. We are the friendlier more affordable storage company.

Posted on July 20, 2014. Brought to you by facebook.

Posted by Anonymous on June 30, 2009. Brought to you by merchantcircle.

Average Rating 20

I rented a unit for one month back in July 2007. As of today, March 4, 2008, I have not received my $10.00 deposit. I have spoken to them several times. I will not stop until I get my money. Are there others who have not gotten their deposit?

Posted by jj9801 on March 03, 2008. Brought to you by localguides.

Business description (5) view all

Affordable Storage can be found at W Pembroke Ave 1635. The following is offered: Warehouse Storage. The entry is present with us since Sep 9, 2010 and was last updated on Nov 14, 2013. In Hampton there are 6 other Warehouse Storage. An overview can be found here.

Posted on September 20, 2015. Brought to you by opendius.

Business, Climate Controlled, Home, Packing Supplies, Personal

Posted on November 03, 2014. Brought to you by merchantcircle.


The best and worst student accommodation #key #colony #beach #motel

#cheapest accommodation

#

The best and worst student accommodation

Students outside their halls of residence at Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Photograph: David Sillitoe

It’s the tallest and largest student accommodation block ever built. It towers 33 floors over London’s Spitalfields market, just minutes from trendy Hoxton and Brick Lane, and promises breathtaking floor-to-ceiling views “you won’t get tired of waking up to”. Its 1,204 student rooms offer everything a bright young thing might want – broadband in every room, chillout spaces boasting giant flat-screen televisions, and an ultra-modern gym and spa.

But what might really take your breath away is the rent. Private developer Nido is charging £14,280 a head to share a flat with three others, or £16,830 if you’d rather have a studio with kitchenette and live by yourself. That’s more than £50,000 just for college accommodation over three years. Unfortunately, they don’t accept Amex.

Guardian Money this week researched accommodation costs in university-owned halls, private student blocks, and shared houses and flats in student areas. Bradford was the runaway winner; the university has the lowest-cost own-accommodation at £53.50 a week (its Laisteridge Lane Halls are Britain’s cheapest); it has the cheapest private halls (starting at £49/week) and its “survival” costs (food and going out) were also the lowest.

The full figures are here. We have relied on the Virgin Guide to British Universities for estimates on food and going out; website Accommodation for Students for the cost of private halls and off-campus shared houses; and university websites for first-year hall of residence fees. The lowest-cost self-catering accommodation (the first figure in the table) starts at £53.50 a week in Bradford, rising to £99 at Durham. Catered accommodation (second figure in the table) rises to as high as £216.44 in Edinburgh.

Overall, the research indicates that the typical student will struggle to survive on less than £7,000 in their first year, taking into account accommodation, food and going out. However, this drops in the second year to below £6,000 as students move out of university or private halls into cheaper rentals.

Our figures are for single-study bedrooms. We did find one location beating Bradford if a student is willing to share a room in his/her first year, and, surprisingly, it was in the otherwise expensive city of Edinburgh. The university has rooms starting at just £2,200 for the academic year. But this is for a twin/bunk room, and it’s not quite Nido Spitalfields. The desirable features highlighted by the university include “carpet” and “bedside lamp”.

Nido Spitalfields isn’t even the most expensive being promoted to students. The somewhat dubious distinction of Britain’s priciest – and probably fanciest – goes to Roland House in South Kensington, London, “five minutes from Imperial College”, according to its listing on website accommodationforstudents.com. The seventh-floor rooms with a view, go for £390 per week – equal to £20,280 a year. Its pampered residents enjoy a gym and spa, a weekly clean, linen and towel supply, internet and Sky TV.

But few British students are likely to see the inside of either Nido Spitalfields or Roland House. At Nido’s other development, near London’s King’s Cross station (cheapest single room: £12,495 a year) around 90% of the occupants are from outside Britain.

Some students – or more likely their parents – might have been hoping that accommodation costs would be falling, given the latest data on sagging house prices. But in the student economy, prices always seem to rise.

Accommodation for Students reckons that rents, based on 59,000 properties across 84 cities, are running 4.3% higher than in 2009 and have risen by 25% since 2004. Its figures mostly cover the type of shared properties taken by second-year students, or those unable to obtain a place in halls in the first year. It said the average is now £65.30 per week, with bills on top.

The table shows the value of downshifting into rented rooms in the second year although, unlike in halls, students have to factor-in other bills such as heating and lighting, plus the fact the landlords usually require them to sign a 12-month contract compared with the 40 weeks common in the private halls.

The average weekly student rent in Reading is £69.11, compared to private halls which start from £129.44.

The average rate for shared properties in Birmingham is £57.30, where private halls typically cost between £90 and £110.

As might be expected, central London and neighbouring areas are the most expensive places to study. The south-east contains eight out of the 10 most expensive student cities.

Those attending Kingston University face average rents of more than £100 per week in their second year. That is almost matched by the cost of the most basic halls provided by the university.

Kingston’s cheapest en suite rooms cost £92.75 a week for a 40-week tenancy, which means at least you are not paying for the summer holidays.

However, these are not big rooms. “Please note the lower fee reflects the small size of the rooms. They are unsuitable if you have a large drawing board or are over 6ft tall,” warns Kingston’s website. Across town, its “luxury” rooms in private halls start at £195 a week.

Simon Thompson, co-founder and director of Accommodation for Students, says: “Students who are going through the clearing process are unlikely to be able to find university accommodation for their first year, and so it is really helpful to know precisely how much they will have to pay for private rented accommodation.”

His website, which is free for to use, puts students in touch with landlords with homes to rent, and other students with rooms to fill.

Meanwhile, a report published last week suggests the problem of student debt is getting worse. The Push Student Debt Survey, which questioned 2,000 students, found that those starting this autumn can expect to owe £24,700, compared with students who began courses last year who are likely to graduate with debts of £23,200.

Undergraduates now owe, on average, £5,600 for each year of study after any help they are given by parents is stripped away. The report found that average debt for students at university in England is £5,293 per year, while in Wales it is £6,411. In Scotland, where fees are still paid centrally, the average debt per year of study is just £2,637.

What you pay per week





Car insurance anaheim #the #9 #worst #u.s. #cities #to #own #a #car,


#

The 9 worst U.S. cities to own a car

The number of Americans driving to work alone is on the rise, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. With the increase in drivers comes traffic, which means more time and money spent idling in cars. Some cities are better equipped to deal with the mass of drivers, managing to keep traffic delays and congestion to a minimum. Other cities are equipped with walkable streets and reliable mass transit options, making car ownership less necessary.

We considered these and other factors to find the worst cities to own a car. Specifically, we looked at hours spent in traffic per year for the average driver, the annual cost of traffic for the average driver, the rate of motor vehicle theft, the number of repair shops and parking garages per driver, the commuter stress index and the non-driving options a resident has for getting around. (See our methodology section for more information on how we created our final ranking.)

Cities on the coasts. The nine cities that make the list are all on or close to the coasts. This makes sense, as many of the largest cities in the country are located on the coasts. Plus, on the East Coast in particular, these cities tend to be older, which means they weren’t built to handle car traffic.

Grin and bear it. Traffic can get pretty bad. However, in some cities getting around by car is just about the only option you have if you want to leave your house. As a result, some cities with terrible traffic, such as Los Angeles, didn’t make the list.

9. Seattle, Washington

Seattle has pretty bad traffic. Commuters here probably aren’t surprised to hear the average driver spends 63 hours per year in traffic. And coupled with the traffic is the high number of motor vehicle thefts. Seattle has the fourth-highest rate of motor vehicle thefts per 1,000 residents in the country.

8. New York, New York

New York is the rare American city where public transportation is usually your best bet for getting from point A to point B. All that accessibility makes car ownership unnecessary here. For New Yorkers who do drive, the traffic is not pleasant. New York drivers spend $1,700 per year, on average, waiting in traffic. That’s the third-highest cost in our study.

7. Anaheim, California

Anaheim commuters are well-acquainted with traffic. Anaheim (and the rest of the Los Angeles metro area) ranks third in average hours per year spent in traffic, first for commuter stress index and fifth for annual cost of idling in traffic. Anaheim only ranks seventh because Walkability.com gives the city a 46 out of 100 for non-driving options. That’s the lowest score in our top 10, meaning, while owning a car here is a pain, not owning one makes getting around a real struggle.

6. Portland, Oregon

Of all the cities in our top 10, Portland is the least onerous for the driving commuter. Commuters driving around the Portland metro area can be thankful that, on average, they spent only 52 hours per year in traffic. That traffic still costs each driver about $1,200. However, drivers in Portland looking for a parking garage may be out of luck. Portland has the second-lowest number of parking garages per driver in our study, and if you are looking to get your car fixed, Portland ranks in the bottom 13 for repair shops per capita.

5. Arlington, Virginia

As previously mentioned, the Washington, D.C. metro area has the worst traffic in the country. Unfortunately for the residents of Arlington, they are a part of that metro area. They face the same brutal 82 hours per year spent in traffic, on average. It costs Arlington residents $1,834 per year, on average, waiting in that traffic. For residents of Arlington, a car is more of a necessity than it is for people living in D.C. which is why it ranks lower in our study.

4. Oakland, California

One argument against car ownership in Oakland is the crime. In 2014, there were almost 6,400 motor vehicle thefts in the city of Oakland, or 15 auto thefts per 1,000 residents. That’s the highest rate in the country. The average Oakland driver can also expect to spend 78 hours per year in traffic. On the plus side, if something goes wrong with your wheels in Oakland, it shouldn’t be too difficult to get it fixed. There are more than six repair shops per 10,000 drivers in Oakland – the highest rate in the top 10.

3. Washington, D.C.

The District and the surrounding metro area sees some of the worst traffic in the country. The average D.C. commuter spends 82 hours per year in traffic. Depending on how you slice it, that’s either two working weeks or almost three-and-a-half days of doing nothing but shaking your fist at your fellow drivers. That traffic is equal to an annual cost of $1,834 per commuter.

2. San Francisco, California

The “City by the Bay” grabs the second spot for worst places to own a car. Being stuck in traffic costs the average commuter in San Francisco $1,600 per year. That cost includes both the value of the time spent in traffic and the cost of gas. San Francisco is also one of the 10 worst cities for motor vehicle thefts per resident, another reason to forgo car ownership.

1. Newark, New Jersey

“Brick City” tops our ranking of the worst U.S. cities to own a car. What’s tough about being a car owner in Newark is the traffic. It’s part of the New York City metro area, which has 19 million people, 5 million of whom drive to work. Newark is stuck right in the middle of this bumper-to-bumper traffic. Plus, if you’re a car owner in Newark, the risk of having your car stolen is much higher than it is in other cities. Newark ranks eighth in the country for motor vehicle thefts per 1,000 residents.


Britannia Hotels is the worst chain in UK, satisfaction survey finds #lowest

#brittania hotels

#

Britannia Hotels is the worst chain in UK , satisfaction survey finds

John Cleese as Basil Fawlty, whose hotel is a byword for poor service BBC

With “rundown” hotels that are “well past their best-by-dates”, Britannia Hotels’ accommodation is said to be more Fawlty Towers than first class.

Now, the hotel group, used by the Home Office to house asylum seekers, has been rated the worst hotel chain in the UK for the second year in a row by the consumers’ association magazine Which?

Ranked last out of 29 chains, Britannia Hotels was awarded just one star – the lowest possible rating – for categories including bedrooms, cleanliness and whether the description of the hotel matched reality.

The Which UK hotel satisfaction survey, based on 5,888 member-experiences, ranked each chain according to an overall customer score based on categories such as customer service, food and value for money. Britannia Hotels, which fared poorly in all categories, achieved 33 per cent for its overall score – 3 per cent lower than in 2013, when it was also bottom of the poll.

The Britannia group, owned by businessman Alex Langsam, has previously acknowledged its problems and plans to “improve the standard” of its hotels, which include the Adelphi Hotel in Liverpool, Bosworth Hall Hotel in Warwickshire, The Grand in Scarborough, the Royal Albion Hotel in Brighton and the Russ Hill Hotel in Surrey.

The Roundhouse Hotel and Heathlands Hotel in Bournemouth and The Grand Burstin Hotel in Kent have been used by the Home Office to temporarily house more than 280 asylum seekers this year due to “overcrowding” at London’s detention centres. The group was unavailable for comment yesterday.

Premier Inn and Travelodge are the most used chains according to the survey, together accounting for more than half of all hotel stays. Premier Inn, visited by 668 members, gained four stars across the board, and an 81 per cent customer satisfaction score. The UK’s largest hotel brand came second only to Sofitel, which was awarded five stars in nearly every category and an 83 per cent customer rating.

Travelodge achieved a 60 per cent overall customer score, improving by 10 per cent since last year. The chain was placed in the bottom three in both 2012 and 2013, but has since invested £57m.

We’ve noticed that you are using an ad blocker.

Advertising helps fund our journalism and keep it truly independent. It helps to build our international editorial team, from war correspondents to investigative reporters, commentators to critics.

Click here to view instructions on how to disable your ad blocker, and help us to keep providing you with free-thinking journalism – for free.

Thank you for your support.

How to disable your ad blocker for independent.co.uk

Adblock / Adblock Plus

  • Click the Adblock/Adblock Plus icon, which is to the right of your address bar.
  • On Adblock click “Don’t run on pages on this domain”.
  • On Adblock Plus click “Enabled on this site” to disable ad blocking for the current website you are on. If you are in Firefox click “disable on independent.co.uk “.

Firefox Tracking Protection

  • If you are Private Browsing in Firefox, “Tracking Protection” may cause the adblock notice to show. It can be temporarily disabled by clicking the “shield” icon in the address bar.

Ghostery

  • Click the Ghostery icon.
  • In versions before 6.0 click “whitelist site”.
  • In version 6.0 click “trust site” or add independent.co.uk to your Trusted Site list.
  • In versions before 6.0 you will see the message “Site is whitelisted”.
  • Click “reload the page to see your changes”.

uBlock

  • Click the uBlock icon.
  • Then click the big power button to whitelist the current web site, and its state will be remembered next time you visit the web site.
  • Then reload the page.




Britain – s – worst – hotel chains named #book #hotel #room

#hotel chains uk

#

Britain’s ‘worst’ hotel chains named

Britannia Hotels has been named the worst hotel chain in Britain by the readers of Which? Travel, the consumer magazine.

The chain, which has 44 hotels in the UK, scored just 36 per cent in an online satisfaction survey conducted by readers of the magazine.

Britannia Hotels promotes itself as providing “affordable accommodation” but respondents described the chain’s hotel rooms as “shabby” and “run-down”.

The chain was rated across six categories and scored one star out of five, the lowest mark, for cleanliness, room fixtures and value for money.

Britannia guests were also surprised to find that a room with a window was £10 extra.

The second worst hotel chain was deemed to be Travelodge, which has 500 properties in the UK.

Travelodge received an overall customer score of 50 per cent but cleanliness, room fixtures and comfort received just two stars, while breakfast was awarded a dismal one star out of five by respondents.

Telegraph Travel has reviewed five Travelodge hotels in recent years, with the properties each receiving a rating of five or six out of ten.

We’ve visited just one Brittania Hotel: the Europa Gatwick, back in 2008. Fiona Duncan, our hotel reviewer, was not impressed.

A total of 8,267 Which? readers, who were also members of the magazine’s online community, took part in the survey.

The best-rated hotel chain was Q Hotels, which has 21 properties and 2,900 bedrooms in the UK.

Q Hotels, which offers “four star luxury” across the UK, scored 78 per cent overall and was awarded five stars out of five for cleanliness and room fixtures, but an average of three stars for value for money.

Other hotel chains to top the list include Radisson Blu Edwardian, which has more than 400 bedrooms in the UK across 14 hotels, achieved an overall score of 77 per cent and was the second highest rated hotel.

Premier Inn, with more than 650 hotels in the UK and 52,000 bedrooms, was the largest chain to feature and scored 76 per cent overall.

The UK’s worst hotel chains (overall customer score)

Britannia Hotels – 36 per cent
Travelodge – 50 per cent
Ramada (excluding Encore) – 51 per cent
PH Hotels (Principal Hayley Hotels) – 51 per cent
De Vere Village – 51 per cent
Shearings Hotels – 52 per cent
Copthorne – 54 per cent
Park Inn by Radisson – 55 per cent
Jurys Inn – 56 per cent
Old English Inns – 59 per cent





The best and worst student accommodation #hospice #care #volunteer

#cheapest accommodation

#

The best and worst student accommodation

Students outside their halls of residence at Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Photograph: David Sillitoe

It’s the tallest and largest student accommodation block ever built. It towers 33 floors over London’s Spitalfields market, just minutes from trendy Hoxton and Brick Lane, and promises breathtaking floor-to-ceiling views “you won’t get tired of waking up to”. Its 1,204 student rooms offer everything a bright young thing might want – broadband in every room, chillout spaces boasting giant flat-screen televisions, and an ultra-modern gym and spa.

But what might really take your breath away is the rent. Private developer Nido is charging £14,280 a head to share a flat with three others, or £16,830 if you’d rather have a studio with kitchenette and live by yourself. That’s more than £50,000 just for college accommodation over three years. Unfortunately, they don’t accept Amex.

Guardian Money this week researched accommodation costs in university-owned halls, private student blocks, and shared houses and flats in student areas. Bradford was the runaway winner; the university has the lowest-cost own-accommodation at £53.50 a week (its Laisteridge Lane Halls are Britain’s cheapest); it has the cheapest private halls (starting at £49/week) and its “survival” costs (food and going out) were also the lowest.

The full figures are here. We have relied on the Virgin Guide to British Universities for estimates on food and going out; website Accommodation for Students for the cost of private halls and off-campus shared houses; and university websites for first-year hall of residence fees. The lowest-cost self-catering accommodation (the first figure in the table) starts at £53.50 a week in Bradford, rising to £99 at Durham. Catered accommodation (second figure in the table) rises to as high as £216.44 in Edinburgh.

Overall, the research indicates that the typical student will struggle to survive on less than £7,000 in their first year, taking into account accommodation, food and going out. However, this drops in the second year to below £6,000 as students move out of university or private halls into cheaper rentals.

Our figures are for single-study bedrooms. We did find one location beating Bradford if a student is willing to share a room in his/her first year, and, surprisingly, it was in the otherwise expensive city of Edinburgh. The university has rooms starting at just £2,200 for the academic year. But this is for a twin/bunk room, and it’s not quite Nido Spitalfields. The desirable features highlighted by the university include “carpet” and “bedside lamp”.

Nido Spitalfields isn’t even the most expensive being promoted to students. The somewhat dubious distinction of Britain’s priciest – and probably fanciest – goes to Roland House in South Kensington, London, “five minutes from Imperial College”, according to its listing on website accommodationforstudents.com. The seventh-floor rooms with a view, go for £390 per week – equal to £20,280 a year. Its pampered residents enjoy a gym and spa, a weekly clean, linen and towel supply, internet and Sky TV.

But few British students are likely to see the inside of either Nido Spitalfields or Roland House. At Nido’s other development, near London’s King’s Cross station (cheapest single room: £12,495 a year) around 90% of the occupants are from outside Britain.

Some students – or more likely their parents – might have been hoping that accommodation costs would be falling, given the latest data on sagging house prices. But in the student economy, prices always seem to rise.

Accommodation for Students reckons that rents, based on 59,000 properties across 84 cities, are running 4.3% higher than in 2009 and have risen by 25% since 2004. Its figures mostly cover the type of shared properties taken by second-year students, or those unable to obtain a place in halls in the first year. It said the average is now £65.30 per week, with bills on top.

The table shows the value of downshifting into rented rooms in the second year although, unlike in halls, students have to factor-in other bills such as heating and lighting, plus the fact the landlords usually require them to sign a 12-month contract compared with the 40 weeks common in the private halls.

The average weekly student rent in Reading is £69.11, compared to private halls which start from £129.44.

The average rate for shared properties in Birmingham is £57.30, where private halls typically cost between £90 and £110.

As might be expected, central London and neighbouring areas are the most expensive places to study. The south-east contains eight out of the 10 most expensive student cities.

Those attending Kingston University face average rents of more than £100 per week in their second year. That is almost matched by the cost of the most basic halls provided by the university.

Kingston’s cheapest en suite rooms cost £92.75 a week for a 40-week tenancy, which means at least you are not paying for the summer holidays.

However, these are not big rooms. “Please note the lower fee reflects the small size of the rooms. They are unsuitable if you have a large drawing board or are over 6ft tall,” warns Kingston’s website. Across town, its “luxury” rooms in private halls start at £195 a week.

Simon Thompson, co-founder and director of Accommodation for Students, says: “Students who are going through the clearing process are unlikely to be able to find university accommodation for their first year, and so it is really helpful to know precisely how much they will have to pay for private rented accommodation.”

His website, which is free for to use, puts students in touch with landlords with homes to rent, and other students with rooms to fill.

Meanwhile, a report published last week suggests the problem of student debt is getting worse. The Push Student Debt Survey, which questioned 2,000 students, found that those starting this autumn can expect to owe £24,700, compared with students who began courses last year who are likely to graduate with debts of £23,200.

Undergraduates now owe, on average, £5,600 for each year of study after any help they are given by parents is stripped away. The report found that average debt for students at university in England is £5,293 per year, while in Wales it is £6,411. In Scotland, where fees are still paid centrally, the average debt per year of study is just £2,637.

What you pay per week





Britannia Hotels is the worst chain in UK, satisfaction survey finds #hospice

#brittania hotels

#

Britannia Hotels is the worst chain in UK , satisfaction survey finds

John Cleese as Basil Fawlty, whose hotel is a byword for poor service BBC

With “rundown” hotels that are “well past their best-by-dates”, Britannia Hotels’ accommodation is said to be more Fawlty Towers than first class.

Now, the hotel group, used by the Home Office to house asylum seekers, has been rated the worst hotel chain in the UK for the second year in a row by the consumers’ association magazine Which?

Ranked last out of 29 chains, Britannia Hotels was awarded just one star – the lowest possible rating – for categories including bedrooms, cleanliness and whether the description of the hotel matched reality.

The Which UK hotel satisfaction survey, based on 5,888 member-experiences, ranked each chain according to an overall customer score based on categories such as customer service, food and value for money. Britannia Hotels, which fared poorly in all categories, achieved 33 per cent for its overall score – 3 per cent lower than in 2013, when it was also bottom of the poll.

The Britannia group, owned by businessman Alex Langsam, has previously acknowledged its problems and plans to “improve the standard” of its hotels, which include the Adelphi Hotel in Liverpool, Bosworth Hall Hotel in Warwickshire, The Grand in Scarborough, the Royal Albion Hotel in Brighton and the Russ Hill Hotel in Surrey.

The Roundhouse Hotel and Heathlands Hotel in Bournemouth and The Grand Burstin Hotel in Kent have been used by the Home Office to temporarily house more than 280 asylum seekers this year due to “overcrowding” at London’s detention centres. The group was unavailable for comment yesterday.

Premier Inn and Travelodge are the most used chains according to the survey, together accounting for more than half of all hotel stays. Premier Inn, visited by 668 members, gained four stars across the board, and an 81 per cent customer satisfaction score. The UK’s largest hotel brand came second only to Sofitel, which was awarded five stars in nearly every category and an 83 per cent customer rating.

Travelodge achieved a 60 per cent overall customer score, improving by 10 per cent since last year. The chain was placed in the bottom three in both 2012 and 2013, but has since invested £57m.

We’ve noticed that you are using an ad blocker.

Advertising helps fund our journalism and keep it truly independent. It helps to build our international editorial team, from war correspondents to investigative reporters, commentators to critics.

Click here to view instructions on how to disable your ad blocker, and help us to keep providing you with free-thinking journalism – for free.

Thank you for your support.

How to disable your ad blocker for independent.co.uk

Adblock / Adblock Plus

  • Click the Adblock/Adblock Plus icon, which is to the right of your address bar.
  • On Adblock click “Don’t run on pages on this domain”.
  • On Adblock Plus click “Enabled on this site” to disable ad blocking for the current website you are on. If you are in Firefox click “disable on independent.co.uk “.

Firefox Tracking Protection

  • If you are Private Browsing in Firefox, “Tracking Protection” may cause the adblock notice to show. It can be temporarily disabled by clicking the “shield” icon in the address bar.

Ghostery

  • Click the Ghostery icon.
  • In versions before 6.0 click “whitelist site”.
  • In version 6.0 click “trust site” or add independent.co.uk to your Trusted Site list.
  • In versions before 6.0 you will see the message “Site is whitelisted”.
  • Click “reload the page to see your changes”.

uBlock

  • Click the uBlock icon.
  • Then click the big power button to whitelist the current web site, and its state will be remembered next time you visit the web site.
  • Then reload the page.




Best and worst UK hotel chains #weekly #rate #motels

#hotel chains uk

#

Best and worst UK hotel chains

Best and worst UK hotel chains

Put us to the test

Our Test Labs compare features and prices on a range of products. Try Which? to unlock our reviews. You’ll instantly be able to compare our test scores, so you can make sure you don’t get stuck with a Don’t Buy.

  • Get the Which? verdict from our independent experts
  • Weigh up the pros and cons in an instant
  • Go to town on the details with our full review
  • Read our member reviews to see what they think
  • Is it a Don’t Buy? It could be a dud, and a costly one too

Looking for the best hotel chain to stay in the UK? We’ve rated 34 UK hotel chains, based on the experiences of over 5,000 customers.

Wondering which hotel chain you can rely on when choosing accommodation in the UK? Our hotel chains survey shows that there can be a big difference in the quality between companies, and that isn’t necessarily down to how much you’ve paid.

Hotel chains rated

We’ve rated 26 large hotel chains including, Hilton Hotels, Holiday Inn, Premier Inn and Travelodge, as well as eight small hotel chains. Unlock the table to find out:

  • Five hotel chains that are Which? Recommended Providers
  • How hotel chains have been rated for factors, including bedrooms, bathrooms, cleanliness and value for money.
  • The highest rated hotel chains that you can book with confidence
  • The lowest rated hotel chains that should be avoided.

To unlock the table, please log in if you’re a member or sign up for £1 to get instant access to all our reviews and results.

Large UK hotel chains

Large hotel chains have 21 or more properties in the group, worldwide.

UK hotel chains

* excluding Hampton by Hilton, Hilton Garden Inn and Double Tree by Hilton
** excluding Ramada Encore
*** Principal Hayley Hotels

Using the table: Star ratings range from one to five. Sample sizes in brackets. WRP stands for Which? Recommended Provider.
Average price paid Cost for a one-night stay, including all room types.
Bedrooms Including furniture, air conditioning, heating, facilities.
Bathrooms Including fixtures and fittings, lighting, towels, toiletries, shower or bath.
Cleanliness Including bedrooms, bathrooms and communal areas.

Small UK hotel chains

Small hotel chains have a maximum of 20 properties in the group, worldwide.

Small UK hotel chains

Average price paid

Brend Hotels (37)

Crerar Hotels (42)

Fullers Hotels (33)

Hastings Hotels (44)

Hotel Du Vin (33)

Warner Leisure (36)

Young’s Hotels (40)

Using the table: Star ratings range from one to five. Sample sizes in brackets. WRP stands for Which? Recommended Provider.
Average price paid Cost for a one-night stay, including all room types.
Bedrooms Including furniture, air conditioning, heating, facilities.
Bathrooms Including fixtures and fittings, lighting, towels, toiletries, shower or bath.
Cleanliness Including bedrooms, bathrooms and communal areas.

How we rate UK hotel chains

Between June and August 2015, we asked Which? members and the general public to complete an online survey about their experience of staying in small and large hotel chains in the past 12 months.

The large hotel chain results are based on 5,991 Which? member experiences. The small hotel chain results are based on 323 general public experiences.

To be considered a chain hotel, the hotel group must have a minimum of five UK properties.

Popular categories





Britain – s – worst – hotel chains named #cumberland #hotel

#hotel chains uk

#

Britain’s ‘worst’ hotel chains named

Britannia Hotels has been named the worst hotel chain in Britain by the readers of Which? Travel, the consumer magazine.

The chain, which has 44 hotels in the UK, scored just 36 per cent in an online satisfaction survey conducted by readers of the magazine.

Britannia Hotels promotes itself as providing “affordable accommodation” but respondents described the chain’s hotel rooms as “shabby” and “run-down”.

The chain was rated across six categories and scored one star out of five, the lowest mark, for cleanliness, room fixtures and value for money.

Britannia guests were also surprised to find that a room with a window was £10 extra.

The second worst hotel chain was deemed to be Travelodge, which has 500 properties in the UK.

Travelodge received an overall customer score of 50 per cent but cleanliness, room fixtures and comfort received just two stars, while breakfast was awarded a dismal one star out of five by respondents.

Telegraph Travel has reviewed five Travelodge hotels in recent years, with the properties each receiving a rating of five or six out of ten.

We’ve visited just one Brittania Hotel: the Europa Gatwick, back in 2008. Fiona Duncan, our hotel reviewer, was not impressed.

A total of 8,267 Which? readers, who were also members of the magazine’s online community, took part in the survey.

The best-rated hotel chain was Q Hotels, which has 21 properties and 2,900 bedrooms in the UK.

Q Hotels, which offers “four star luxury” across the UK, scored 78 per cent overall and was awarded five stars out of five for cleanliness and room fixtures, but an average of three stars for value for money.

Other hotel chains to top the list include Radisson Blu Edwardian, which has more than 400 bedrooms in the UK across 14 hotels, achieved an overall score of 77 per cent and was the second highest rated hotel.

Premier Inn, with more than 650 hotels in the UK and 52,000 bedrooms, was the largest chain to feature and scored 76 per cent overall.

The UK’s worst hotel chains (overall customer score)

Britannia Hotels – 36 per cent
Travelodge – 50 per cent
Ramada (excluding Encore) – 51 per cent
PH Hotels (Principal Hayley Hotels) – 51 per cent
De Vere Village – 51 per cent
Shearings Hotels – 52 per cent
Copthorne – 54 per cent
Park Inn by Radisson – 55 per cent
Jurys Inn – 56 per cent
Old English Inns – 59 per cent





Best and worst UK hotel chains #in #patient #hospice #care

#hotel chains uk

#

Best and worst UK hotel chains

Best and worst UK hotel chains

Put us to the test

Our Test Labs compare features and prices on a range of products. Try Which? to unlock our reviews. You’ll instantly be able to compare our test scores, so you can make sure you don’t get stuck with a Don’t Buy.

  • Get the Which? verdict from our independent experts
  • Weigh up the pros and cons in an instant
  • Go to town on the details with our full review
  • Read our member reviews to see what they think
  • Is it a Don’t Buy? It could be a dud, and a costly one too

Looking for the best hotel chain to stay in the UK? We’ve rated 34 UK hotel chains, based on the experiences of over 5,000 customers.

Wondering which hotel chain you can rely on when choosing accommodation in the UK? Our hotel chains survey shows that there can be a big difference in the quality between companies, and that isn’t necessarily down to how much you’ve paid.

Hotel chains rated

We’ve rated 26 large hotel chains including, Hilton Hotels, Holiday Inn, Premier Inn and Travelodge, as well as eight small hotel chains. Unlock the table to find out:

  • Five hotel chains that are Which? Recommended Providers
  • How hotel chains have been rated for factors, including bedrooms, bathrooms, cleanliness and value for money.
  • The highest rated hotel chains that you can book with confidence
  • The lowest rated hotel chains that should be avoided.

To unlock the table, please log in if you’re a member or sign up for £1 to get instant access to all our reviews and results.

Large UK hotel chains

Large hotel chains have 21 or more properties in the group, worldwide.

UK hotel chains

* excluding Hampton by Hilton, Hilton Garden Inn and Double Tree by Hilton
** excluding Ramada Encore
*** Principal Hayley Hotels

Using the table: Star ratings range from one to five. Sample sizes in brackets. WRP stands for Which? Recommended Provider.
Average price paid Cost for a one-night stay, including all room types.
Bedrooms Including furniture, air conditioning, heating, facilities.
Bathrooms Including fixtures and fittings, lighting, towels, toiletries, shower or bath.
Cleanliness Including bedrooms, bathrooms and communal areas.

Small UK hotel chains

Small hotel chains have a maximum of 20 properties in the group, worldwide.

Small UK hotel chains

Average price paid

Brend Hotels (37)

Crerar Hotels (42)

Fullers Hotels (33)

Hastings Hotels (44)

Hotel Du Vin (33)

Warner Leisure (36)

Young’s Hotels (40)

Using the table: Star ratings range from one to five. Sample sizes in brackets. WRP stands for Which? Recommended Provider.
Average price paid Cost for a one-night stay, including all room types.
Bedrooms Including furniture, air conditioning, heating, facilities.
Bathrooms Including fixtures and fittings, lighting, towels, toiletries, shower or bath.
Cleanliness Including bedrooms, bathrooms and communal areas.

How we rate UK hotel chains

Between June and August 2015, we asked Which? members and the general public to complete an online survey about their experience of staying in small and large hotel chains in the past 12 months.

The large hotel chain results are based on 5,991 Which? member experiences. The small hotel chain results are based on 323 general public experiences.

To be considered a chain hotel, the hotel group must have a minimum of five UK properties.

Popular categories





Britain – s – worst – hotel chains named #motels #san #diego

#hotel chains uk

#

Britain’s ‘worst’ hotel chains named

Britannia Hotels has been named the worst hotel chain in Britain by the readers of Which? Travel, the consumer magazine.

The chain, which has 44 hotels in the UK, scored just 36 per cent in an online satisfaction survey conducted by readers of the magazine.

Britannia Hotels promotes itself as providing “affordable accommodation” but respondents described the chain’s hotel rooms as “shabby” and “run-down”.

The chain was rated across six categories and scored one star out of five, the lowest mark, for cleanliness, room fixtures and value for money.

Britannia guests were also surprised to find that a room with a window was £10 extra.

The second worst hotel chain was deemed to be Travelodge, which has 500 properties in the UK.

Travelodge received an overall customer score of 50 per cent but cleanliness, room fixtures and comfort received just two stars, while breakfast was awarded a dismal one star out of five by respondents.

Telegraph Travel has reviewed five Travelodge hotels in recent years, with the properties each receiving a rating of five or six out of ten.

We’ve visited just one Brittania Hotel: the Europa Gatwick, back in 2008. Fiona Duncan, our hotel reviewer, was not impressed.

A total of 8,267 Which? readers, who were also members of the magazine’s online community, took part in the survey.

The best-rated hotel chain was Q Hotels, which has 21 properties and 2,900 bedrooms in the UK.

Q Hotels, which offers “four star luxury” across the UK, scored 78 per cent overall and was awarded five stars out of five for cleanliness and room fixtures, but an average of three stars for value for money.

Other hotel chains to top the list include Radisson Blu Edwardian, which has more than 400 bedrooms in the UK across 14 hotels, achieved an overall score of 77 per cent and was the second highest rated hotel.

Premier Inn, with more than 650 hotels in the UK and 52,000 bedrooms, was the largest chain to feature and scored 76 per cent overall.

The UK’s worst hotel chains (overall customer score)

Britannia Hotels – 36 per cent
Travelodge – 50 per cent
Ramada (excluding Encore) – 51 per cent
PH Hotels (Principal Hayley Hotels) – 51 per cent
De Vere Village – 51 per cent
Shearings Hotels – 52 per cent
Copthorne – 54 per cent
Park Inn by Radisson – 55 per cent
Jurys Inn – 56 per cent
Old English Inns – 59 per cent